Tag Archives: knitting

Nantahala Shawl

Purchase the pattern HERE on Ravelry.

Last fall I was able to attend the New York State Sheep and Wool Festival in Rhinebeck, NY.  We drove up out of New York City, enjoying the gorgeous hardwood forests, still green, as it was unseasonably warm for that time of year.

Darling sheep at Rhinebeck

I’ve lived in the western US for half of my life, but I am an east coast girl, born and bred.  Nothing stirs my soul like being in a sun dappled, east coast forest.  I love the green, I love the filtered light, I love the smell…it’s like being home.

In February of this year at Stitches West, I was perusing the marketplace and was immediately attracted to two skeins of Meadowcroft Dyeworks Silk Traveler in Grasshopper.   The gorgeous greens were the exact colors of a sun dappled forest.

And so the Nantahala Shawl was born.  Named after the Nantahala National Forest in North Carolina, this top down, crescent shaped shawl has a pleasing mix of simple lace and squishy garter stitch sections and ends with a delicate picot bind-off.

 

 

Yellowstone Skate Ski Hat

Star Wars Spin Master BB-8 and Barbie Smart Dream House, it’s time to move over and make room for the #1 hot gift of the season…The Messy Bun Hat!  Also known as the ponytail hat, this topless hat pattern is the most requested style of knitted gifts for the season.

Yellowstone Skate Ski Hat
Yellowstone Skate Ski Hat

Knit in The Buffalo Wool Company’s Earth Aran (90% bison down, 10% nylon), this cabled, topless hat is a perfect choice for active winter sports lovers.

Downhill, telemark, backcountry, crosscountry and skate skiing are some of the different types of skiing we enjoy in snowy Alta, Wyoming.  And even when it’s 20 degrees fahrenheit (-6.6 C), when the sun is shining it’s hot outside!

It's 18 degrees F outside, too hot for a hat!
It’s 18 degrees F outside, too hot for a hat!

The Yellowstone Skate Ski Hat is perfect for keeping your ears cozy and snug while allowing your ponytail (or messy bun) plenty of freedom.  And if the sun isn’t shining (brrrrr!) you can pull this hat over your head and wear it as a neck gaiter.  Perfect!

Yellowstone Skate Ski Hat worn as a neck gaiter
Yellowstone Skate Ski Hat worn as a neck gaiter

Hope you enjoy knitting this pattern, revised with new charts.   You can find my original page featuring the hat here and  can download it here on Ravelry.

Barchan Earflap Hat

Download the pattern from Ravelry FREE for 24 hours!

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The Barchan Earflap Hat is named after the horseshoe-shaped snowdrifts called barchans.  Worked from the top down with a provisional cast-on, this ribbed hat has a seamless construction with no short rows or stitches to pick up.  The slouchy version of the hat is shown, but the pattern can be easily adapted for a beanie style, with or without earflaps.

I’m in love with the Lana Grossa Fur Pom Pom from The Trendsetter Yarn Group.  It attaches easily with a snap which you stitch onto the hat.  It’s just so soft and fuzzy and gorgeous!

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I used the beautiful worsted wool I bought in Dresden, Germany a few years ago at The Green Wheel.  I love having yarn as a souvenir.  It was so much fun to relive a little bit of that amazing trip!

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Darling German cherub
Darling German cherub

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Vixen Sweater

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Download the Vixen Sweater from Ravelry.  It’s FREE for 24 hours!

Last month I was lucky enough to attend the New York State Sheep and Wool Festival (aka Rhinebeck) for the very first time.  I saw lots of lovely knitters in gorgeous sweaters.

At the Buffalo Wool Company booth
At the Buffalo Wool Company booth
Gorgeous shawls
Beautiful shawls
I love these sweaters
I love these sweaters
Fabulous cable details
Fabulous cable details

And the weather was perfect!

I’m happy to announce the release of my first sweater pattern this season, the Vixen Sweater.

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This mock turtleneck is named after the Vixen Geyser in Yellowstone National Park. The geyser is named because of it’s temperamental, feisty nature, like a fox!

In the Vixen Sweater pattern, Rowan Felted Tweed DK is paired with Rowan Kidsilk Haze which adds a touch of cozy glamour to the sporty stripes of this simple, relaxed, top town raglan sweater.

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Because there’s no waist shaping, it’s easy to adjust this pattern to your own preferences.  Lengthen or shorten the neck, add or subtract length by using more or less stripes.

You’ll want to make sure you end with a stretch bind-off for the hem.  Here’s a video tutorial for the Russian bind-off.

 

Caribou Wildflower Cowl

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Download this pattern from Ravelry here.

The Caribou-Targhee National Forest spans over 2.63 million acres, much of which is a part of the Greater Yellowstone Eco System in Idaho and Wyoming.  A small part of this forest, the Jedediah Smith Wilderness is less than five miles from my home in Alta, Wyoming.  All summer, the wilderness area rewards our months of snow and cold with a stunning abundance of mountain wildflowers.

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This fair isle, fashioned in a tube then grafted together to form a circle, is made for winter.  I really enjoyed working with Blue Sky Fibers Baby Alpaca.  The luxurious warmth and silky softness of this fiber is heaven to knit!  It’s perfect to wear on those cold days when you’re dreaming of summer and mountain wildflowers.

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If you’re feeling a little intimidated by grafting the tube using kitchener in the round, here’s a great video to get you through it and weave in the ends as well!

Dreaming of Edinburgh Mitts

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Download the pattern from Ravelry here.

I’ve traveled all over the European continent, but I’ve never been to Edinburgh.  I see the pictures, I read the stories, I imagine beautiful, kind peole wrapped in cozy, classic knits drinking tea by the fire while darling little hedgehogs frolic in the yard around garden gnomes.

I may not have it exactly right, but when the day comes that I do go to to Edinburgh, I’ll be wearing these elbow length argyle mitts.

Made with Rowan Yarns’s Felted Tweed DK, Dreaming of Edinburgh Mitts are worked flat to facilitate the simple intarsia design, have a relaxed fit and are tapered down the arm to the wrist with a thumb gusset.

If you’re new to the intarsia technique, here’s some helpful tips.

Please check out the color palatte my test knitter used for this pattern.  It’s all gorgeous greys and pinks!

 

Sedona Lace Scarf

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Sedona Lace Scarf by Selena Miskin

PURCHASE SEDONA LACE SCARF PATTERN ON RAVELRY

For spring break this year we put the boyz in the car, left our snowy playground in Alta, Wyoming and drove to Queen’s Creek, Arizona to visit my parents and their swimming pool. The weather was perfect and the meals were fabulous (my mom’s a great cook!)

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Arizona cactus in bloom

On our way home we took a slight detour to Sedona, Arizona. I was pleasantly surprised when my husband asked if there was a yarn store I wanted to visit. (He’s a keeper!)

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We went over to Knitwits located at 2370 West Highway 89A, Suite 3, And found the most wonderful surprise. Tom and Becky Helgesen, owners of the store, bought all of the last of The YarnSisters Black Pearl Yarn in the white colorway and hired local indie dyer, Stacy Yamauchi to transform each skein into some of the most spectacular colors I’ve ever seen.

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Black Pearl Yarn

You can give Knitwits a call, pick out a skein you like and they will deliver it right to your home.

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My beautiful purchase of Black Pearl Yarn

This yarn is heaven to knit! I worked on the design for several week, casting on and ripping out until I felt happy with a pattern that was simple, elegant and not boring to knit. I especially love how the lace pattern shows little purled mountains, as lovely as the red rocks in Sedona. This long rectangle scarf would be just as beautiful using a less-formal fiber like wool.

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Sedona Lace Scarf by Selena Miskin